Coaching

Being a hands-on coach is home and hearth to who I am and what I believe in. Few things replace first-hand experience and the lessons that come as a direct result of working with others. While many coaches discuss their “philosophy,” I’ve instead always focused more on values.

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pecifically, it’s my opinion that effective coaching in the performance world is about figuring out an athlete’s purpose and matching it with an evidence-based process. It is about fundamentals, not fluff. There are no “tricks” or quick fixes for enhancing performance over the long-term, and while commitment and consistency may not be convenient- both are necessary linchpins if the athlete hopes to achieve a long, healthy and productive career.

Simply put, the lessons I have learned throughout my career working with athletes of all kinds, across a wide variety of settings, have taught me that coaches need to be adaptable, not dogmatic.

Coaching is chess, not checkers. It is far more complex than most think, and it requires a commitment to learning how to operate flexibly across a multitude of chaotic situations and circumstances while putting your ego to the side.

Adopting this multi-directional management approach is my definition of the term “Conscious Coaching” as it requires a 360° view and awareness of the countless variables that can influence the performance environment and the outcomes we hope to achieve.

Brett Bartholomew

Performance Training

Coach Education

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Conscious Coaching Book

  • Successful interventions begin with more successful interactions

    Brett Bartholomew
  • Consistency and clarity of purpose together are the most potent precursors to performance

    Brett Bartholomew
  • Great coaches don't seek to control complex environments, they adapt to them.

    Brett Bartholomew
  • Be adaptable, not dogmatic. It's our job to attache significance and meaning to behaviors that we want others to adopt or adapt.

    Brett Bartholomew
  • Enhanced engagement with your athletes starts by knowing how to get attention, progresses by helping them get results, and lasts though building trust.

    Brett Bartholomew
  • Aside from research, two of the most potent ingredients necessary for proper coach development are repetition and direct exposure. You have to be hands-on, and must be exposed to divers and chaotic situations.

    Brett Bartholomew
  • People often crave the answer(s) which will confirm their own pre-existing bias or localized perspective. When someone tells us we are wrong our first response is to become defensive instead of becoming proactive.

    Brett Bartholomew